Living with Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is a chronic and often debilitating disease which attacks the central nervous system (the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves). It is the most common neurological disease in young adults and attacks people at the time of their lives when they are planning families and building a career.

Every day four people are diagnosed with multiple sclerosis which equates to an additional 1,000 every year. The average age of diagnosis is between 20 and 40 years of age, although symptoms may begin much earlier. Three out of four people living with multiple sclerosis are women. No two cases of multiple sclerosis are identical and the severity and progression of the condition cannot be predicted.

The Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis

Many of the symptoms of multiple sclerosis go unnoticed by everyone except the person living with them and therefore are easily dismissed or ignored by the community at large. The visible and hidden symptoms of the disease are unpredictable and vary from person to person and from time to time in the same person.

Symptoms vary from person to person, but can include:

  • Extreme fatigue
  • Pain and numbness
  • Pins and needles
  • Cognitive difficulties
  • Sensitivity to heat and/or cold
  • Difficulties with walking, balance or coordination
  • Dizziness and vertigo
  • Continence problems
  • Blurred vision
  • Tremors
  • In severe cases, paralysis

Can Multiple Sclerosis be Cured?

Multiple sclerosis is a lifelong disease for which a cause and cure are yet to be found. However, doctors and scientists are constantly making new discoveries about the treatment and management of multiple sclerosis.

The money you fundraise enables MS to provide vital funds to help people living with multiple sclerosis access the services, support, treatment and information they need to continue to live full and uncompromised lives.

You can find out more about multiple sclerosis at the MS website.

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